An interview - part II

They had already embraced the more ambient side of things that people like Brian Eno and Ash Ra were pioneering, and to me it makes sense that they would probably have joined in with the whole free rave/crustie scene with vim and/or verve. There's many instances where artists from the Rock and Prog world have dipped a toe or two in the dance or club arena, and I don't think it's too much of a leap to suggest that The Lens might possibly have explored that side of their, you know, tendencies...

Progressive rock in the same breath as Dance and Rave?

Think about it for a while... The accepted wisdom is that Kraftwerk were/are the godfathers of techno. We can all see the logic in that, but what about bands like Hawkwind? Not a drum machine in sight, but actually really quite trancey when you stop to consider it: pumping, monotonous grooves with weird, trippy synth noises, and everyone losing it at gigs. Could be any club in Britain in the late '90s... It's no coincidence that The Lens would often cover 'Lord of Light' and 'Master of the Universe' by Hawkwind...

So should we expect 'Euphoria Volume 12'?

No - there's a real mixture of stuff on this album - from very, very, very laid back 'Floydy' grooves through some 'work-out' progressive rock, to a mixture of chilled out progressive trance...

And all new material then?

Well, nearly all new... there are two bits on this album that are actually over 20 years old. I wrote 'A little robot juice' in the early '80s shortly after The Lens were put out to pasture, and it's been given a Noughties makeover (as they say on daytime TV) with a great laid back drum pattern and nice fretless bass.

The other bit of old 'tuneage' is the middle section of 'Full of stars'. Trivia enthusiasts will be interested to learn that I originally wrote this for IQ around the time of the 'Are you sitting comfortably?' album. It formed the central theme for 'Falling apart at the seams' which we added more and more bits to during its development.

Somewhere along the way it was felt that the original piece no longer
fitted with everything else in the track and it was dropped...

Margaret

You are viewing the text version of this site.

To view the full version please install the Adobe Flash Player and ensure your web browser has JavaScript enabled.

Need help? check the requirements page.


Get Flash Player